Game of the Year

Game of the Year: Fiscal Kombat

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! The world is in a… weird spot right now, politically speaking. All over the globe folks with troubling leanings seem to be grabbing significant amounts of power, even with their dumb small hands. After the disasters in America, Britain, and beyond, France’s presidential election could be the next example of the international fascist slide backward. Fortunately, video games are here to help #resist. After you learn how to virtually punch Nazis, learn how to virtually shake down the one percent in Fiscal Kombat, this week’s Game of the Year. [embedded content] After several rounds of voting, the remaining candidates in the French presidential election are Emmanuel Macron of the En Marche! or Forward!…

board games

Game of the Year: Lords of Cannabis

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! Regardless of whether or not you can legally smoke weed in your state, you probably shouldn’t start running a large-scale marijuana growing operation. The world doesn’t need more drug kingpins, even if they do make for great TV show characters. Fortunately, we have games that let us act out fantasies we could or should never do in real life like stealing cars while evading cops or stepping on turtles while being Italian. Lords of Cannabis, this week’s Game of the Year, is a board game about making the sticky icky, dank nugs, sweet kush, etc., for the masses under the radar. And if you’re a fan of a certain other popular board game,…

cars

Game of the Year: Wheelman

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! He may be a swole dad, but Vin Diesel is also a huge nerd. The Last Witch Hunter is based on his Dungeons & Dragons character, and he’s compared the escalating ridiculousness of the Fast and Furious franchise to party members leveling up in the seminal tabletop RPG. In 2002, he even started his own video game company, Tigon Studios, which helped bring to life the shockingly excellent Chronicles of Riddick shooters. However, to celebrate the release of The Fate of the Furious, this week’s Game of the Year highlights another Tigon Studios joint: Vin Diesel’s Wheelman. [embedded content] Wheelman released in 2009 around the time Diesel officially returned to his READ FULL…

BAFTA

BAFTA Games Awards 2017 Winners: Uncharted 4 Takes Home Best Game

At last night’s British Academy Games Awards 2017, Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End took home Best Game, while Inside won four awards, including Artistic Achievement and Game Design. The Uncharted franchise now has five BAFTA wins in total, with the previous four being handed to Uncharted 2: Among Thieves. Brenda Romero, meanwhile, was presented the Special Award “in recognition of her outstanding creative contribution to the industry and for her illustrious career in game design, her advocacy for the art and creative process behind game-making, and her commitment to encouraging the next generation of talent in the industry.” Here’s the full list of winners from the BAFTA Games Awards 2017 (winners in bold): Artistic Achievement Abzu Dishonored 2 Inside The Last Guardian Uncharted 4 Unravel Audio Achievement Battlefield 1 Doom Inside The Last Guardian Rez Infinite Uncharted 4 Best Game Firewatch Inside Overwatch Stardew Valley Titanfall 2 Uncharted 4 British Game Batman: Arkham VR Forza Horizon 3 No Man’s Sky Overcooked Planet Coaster Virginia Debut Game Firewatch Overcooked Oxenfree That Dragon, Cancer The Witness Virginia Evolving Game Destiny: Rise of Iron Elite Dangerous: Horizons EVE Online Final Fantasy XIV: Online Hitman Rocket League Family LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens READ FULL…

Drakengard

Nier: Automata Is a Game of the Year, and Here Are Tons of Spoilers Why

I tried to show Nier: Automata to a colleague. I told him that it’s an example of how a game can be art, exploring philosophical questions with fantastic audio and visual presentation, coupled with mechanics that are both rock-solid on their own right and play with how we interact with games. Then he saw a blindfolded teenage boy walk out of a vending machine. Nier: Automata is a masterpiece, but one that’s still really weird in a really Japanese way. That’s because Yoko Taro is an auteur game designer in the vein of Suda 51, Swery65, and Hideo Kojima: a Japanese game developer with unique vision, and is also a huge weirdo. I don’t use that term lightly. The dude wears a skull-faced moon mask in public. Anyway, Nier: Automata. I’m going to warn you, the rest of this post will be full of spoilers for Nier: Automata, Nier, and Drakengard. If you’re remotely interested in taking the full Nier: Automata ride, you should stop reading right now, get the game, and play through it three times. Don’t worry, it won’t be repetitive. If you’re okay with spoilers, read on. It’s time to dissect exactly how Yoko Taro is incredible….

fighting games

Game of the Year: M.U.G.E.N.

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! Seeing as they are all about who would win in a fight, in the fighting game genre, crossovers reign supreme. But for as many familiar faces developers can cram into Super Smash Bros. and Injustice and Marvel vs. Capcom, they can never present every possible rumble you can dream up. However, one game, or rather one game engine, does offer that seemingly impossible achievement: M.U.G.E.N., this week’s Game of the Year. [embedded content] No one remembers what the M.U.G.E.N. acronym stands for, not even the developer Elecbyte. But that’s fitting for this free, nearly twenty-year-old engine with an almost mythic quality. Mugen is an engine for developing 2D, sprite-based fighting games. READ FULL…

Game of the Year

Game Of The Year: Imbroglio

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! Mobile gaming is, for the most part, a desolate wasteland of clones and cash grabs. The App Store overflows like a toilet with Clash of Clans and Crossy Road-alikes, churned out in days and stuffed with microtransactions to ensnare tweens into spending money. But then there’s developers like Michael Brough, who’s latest game Imbroglio costs a few bucks up front and will keep you busy for, in my case, years. I first played Imbroglio two years ago when I was serving as a judge for the Independent Games Festival. I played nearly 100 different games during my month of judging. Some were great. Some were terrible. Imbroglio is the only one I READ…

blizzard

Game of the Year: StarCraft

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! As a bonafide classic and my single favorite game of all-time, StarCraft is a no-brainer for Game of the Year. But I figured I said pretty much all I had to say about the revolutionary sci-fi real-time strategy game in my exhaustive review of StarCraft II’s final expansion. However, Blizzard recently confirmed that the original masterpiece is being remastered, so soon you can play it even if you’re allergic to sub-4K graphics. That’s as good an excuse as any to once again talk about how outstanding StarCraft is. [embedded content] What is there really left to say about StarCraft, though? Almost twenty years ago, god-tier game developer Blizzard evolved the real-time READ FULL…

food

Game of the Year: I Am Bread

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! I’ll spare you some of the details, but I have a bit of a thing for anthropomorphic food. Islands full of talking fruit. Comic strips about mischievous eggplants. Novels chronicling the drama of mopey pies. Sausage Party. I’ll eat it all up, figuratively speaking. Heck, in college a group of friends and I taught ourselves Photoshop by turning each other into bread people like “Jordanish Minor.” This week’s Game of the Year stars food that’s decidedly realistic. It doesn’t talk or emote or do anything real food doesn’t do. However, I Am Bread may be the only game that captures what it truly feels like to be food. [embedded content] In READ FULL…

2017 SXSW Gaming Awards

2017 SXSW Gaming Awards: Uncharted 4 Wins Game of the Year

At the 2017 SXSW Gaming Awards over the weekend, Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End took home a number of awards, including Video Game of the Year and Excellence in Animation. In the GOTY category, it was up against Titanfall 2, Overwatch, Dishonored 2, and DOOM. You can see the full list of winners and nominees at the 2017 SXSW Gaming Awards below (winners in bold): Video Game of the Year Awarded to the game that exemplifies overall excellence and creates a distinct gaming experience across all platforms and genres. Dishonored 2 – Bethesda Softworks / Arkane Studios DOOM – Bethesda Softworks / id Software Overwatch – Blizzard Entertainment Titanfall 2 – Electronic Arts / Respawn Entertainment Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End – Sony Computer Entertainment / Naughty Dog Mobile Game of the Year Clash Royale – Supercell Pokémon GO – Niantic Pokémon Sun and Moon – The Pokémon Company / Game Freak Reigns – Devolver Digital / Nerial Severed – DrinkBox Studios Tabletop Game of the Year Arkham Horror: The Card Game – Fantasy Flight Games Captain Sonar – Matagot Inis – Matagot Mechs vs Minions – Riot Games The Others – CMON Inc. eSports Game of the Year Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare READ FULL…

Game of the Year

Night in the Woods is my Horror Game of the Year

Night in the Woods is a fantastic game with a charming art style that belies its incredibly honest and resonant stories. In other words, Scott Benson, Alec Holowka, and Bethany Hockenberry made a Game of the Year. You can look at it however you want, as an adventure game, a visual novel, a social simulator, a series of minigames threaded by a plot. I personally see it as the most effective horror game I’ve ever played. I’m an exile from a small town in central Pennsylvania. It’s a self-imposed exile, the typical story of a nerd growing up in rural America and then leaving to make a life in the city. I went to college, graduated, and moved to New York. I recognize how luck was a big factor in getting to where I am, and that makes Mae Borowski and her friends’ stories genuinely terrifying to me. Mae is a college dropout returning home and dealing with aimless restlessness. She’s back in her small town, with her old friends trying to build their lives while her own future is a complete blank. She moves back in with her parents, touches base with her old friends, and tries to just READ…

burger king

Game of the Year: Sneak King

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! Enough fooling around with sex toys and chicken bands. It’s time to get to the Burger King content that truly matters. Sneak King is a stealth-action video game where you play as the Burger King King and surprise folks with Whoppers. It’s the game that the Game of the Year column was made for. [embedded content] As part of a deal with Microsoft, in 2006 Burger King and developer Blitz Games released three vaguely Burger King-themed games for the Xbox, and Xbox 360 customers could purchase alongside their burgers and fries for a limited time. They were nothing but glorified ads, and two of the games in the series, PocketBike Racer READ FULL…

bill paxton

Game of the Year: The Gamechangers

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com, we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! Recently the world lost a great actor. Bill Paxton passed away on February 25 at the age of 61. You probably remember Paxton from beloved James Cameron films like The Terminator, Aliens, True Lies, and Titanic. Or maybe you’re a Twister or Apollo 13 fan. Heck, he was even a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. He played villainous Hydra spy John Garrett in the first season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. Just don’t confuse him with Bill Pullman. This week’s game of the year celebrates Bill Paxton’s contribution to video games. No, we’re not talking about his parts in Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare or Sewer Shark. This week’s game of the year is…

Game of the Year

Game of the Year: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

For too long the definition of “Game of the Year” has been unfairly narrow. How boring is it to see every website shower the same stale AAA games with praise at the end of each holiday season? So at Geek.com, we’re doing what we can to put a stop to this in Game of the Year, a new column celebrating worthy alternative picks for the year’s greatest game regardless of genre, platform, year of release, or even quality. Here, any game can be Game of the Year! The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is very much like the original Legend of Zelda on the NES. Except Breath of the Wild is playable and good. Free from 30-year-old technical limitations, Breath of the Wild delivers that same sense of freedom and mystery (only greater) while giving players enough ways to actually meaningful interact with the world to make exploration enjoyable. And while there is a lot to learn like how to reach certain spots or how to simply not die, you’re rarely left completely in the dark about how to achieve the macro, story goals. In this way, Breath of the Wild’s open-world fundamental re-imagining of Zelda finally fulfills the initial…